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Material Test 2

March 29, 2017
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Instructor: Stefani Bardin || Collaborators: Kadallah Burrowes

The previous material test, although fruitful with mycelium, did not have a consistency or texture that could be easily extruded for a 3D printer nozzle.  This round of material tests, Kadallah and I blended flour, corn starch, and honey into the inoculated  substrate material.  We had three material tests: one with substrate and honey only, the second with substrate, flour, and honey, and the third with substrate, corn starch, and honey.  We tested with corn starch and flour to thicken and smooth out the texture of the paste.  We need something that extrudes easily and binds to itself well for our 3D printer.  The problem is, we aren’t too sure how the corn starch or the four will affect the mycelium growth.  The mushroom may not grow well with the given nutrients of the new materials.  We added varying amounts of honey to each of our new mixtures to see if the sugars will help the mycelium growth.

 

 

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Material Test 1

March 22, 2017
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Instructor: Stefani Bardin || Collaborators: Kadallah Burrowes

In this first round of material tests, we blended the coffee bean husk substrate material in a food processor to get an even texture for our 3D printer extruder nozzle.  We experimented with the ratio of substrate material to mushroom inoculate.  There is a set of material samples that use a 1:4 mushroom spore to substrate material blend and a second set of material samples that has a 1:2 mushroom spore to substrate material blend.  We also experimented with three different blending methods.  There is a machine blend (very even), a hand mix (fairly even), and a post inoculated test (no blend).

The images above show mushroom mycelia growth after 10 days.  The machine blend with 1:2 ratio, spore to substrate mix, had the smoothest and strongest mycelium growth.  The hand mixed samples were strong but not smooth in growth texture.  The post inoculated samples were very brittle and not smooth.  The machine blend had growth that was structurally strong with a smooth silky texture on the exterior even after we baked the samples.  Our next round of tests will focus on creating a material that can be extruded smoothly.  This blend, although fine in texture, was difficult to extrude.  When pushed from a plastic bag with force, the substrate material broke apart and separated from water.  We need a material that stick to itself well, won’t break, and will not separate from water.

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Newtown 2050

March 20, 2017
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Collaborators: Marina Zurkow, Nick Hubbard, Rebecca Lieberman

Above: Map of the surrounding area of Newtown Creek.  Map shows rising tide predictions for 2050 as well as the currently documented city owned green spaces and community gardens.

The purpose of this project is to understand the current situation of the Newtown Creek area as a government SuperFund site, as well as to try to imagine what the creek can be and what we can do to activate change in the area for its sustainable future.  The main issue is that the creek and its problems are not very accessible to the local community.

Issues and interventions along the Gowanus Canal, in contrast, are a lot more well known to the Gowanus area community.  Artists and designers have created ad hoc systems to mitigate street run off and canal pollution.  Newtown 2050 is a mapping project designed to encourage bottom-up participation with the Newtown Creek clean up in a similar way that has been exhibited along the Gowanus Canal.

Above: Selection of images of Gowanus Canal interventions and ad hoc green spaces.

There are two parts to this mapping project.  Part one will be to make a survey map, a physical printed map, that I can use to collect data of informal green interventions.  ….more soon…

Image of Unity landscape generated from Mapbox data.  

Above: Rhino import from Unity-Mapbox.  View East Williamsburg towards Manhattan and Long Island City, Queens.

Above:  Newly modeled Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, Location of the Newtown Creek Nature Walk site, and the Newtown Creek waterway.  View from Greenpoint to Manhattan and Long Island City Queens.

Above: Newtown Creek Nature Walk Rhino model space, satellite map from google, and ground view from nature walk.

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deFACEment

March 19, 2017
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in XYZ
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Collaborators: Carlie (Yutong) Zhang and Anastasis Genmanidis

Above:  Sketches made in Processing and later translated for OpenFrameworks.  Theses gestures were based on our original sketches that we did by hand. Currently, these sketches are being drawn at the ‘discretion’ of the computer. Above:  Anastasis controlling the X-Carve with Python commands through Terminal.

Above: (left to right) sketches with robot testing positioning, example of code from Processing, polystyrene sheeting which cracked under stress of the drawing machine (this was later replaced with vinyl which gave it a proper amount of spring).

Above: Sketches made by robot through terminal with more control.Above: (left to right) Rhino model of pen holder, fabricated pen holder with 3D printed and lasercut parts, pen holder drawing (showing spring mechanism from the side)

Right:  Facial recognition of camera running in OpenFrameworks.  Camera recognizes drawing area with the QR code in the bottom right corner of the drawing.  We used OFX_Aruco and OFX_FaceTracker to recognize face and drawing plane.Above:  Bot running smoooothly.

Programming Process

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[Final] Conversations in Punk: Art within Intellectual Climate Change

March 19, 2017
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-Abstract:  The workshop will be an open symposium on art, art movements, and cultural paradigm shifts.  We will look at art work and the context in which it was made.

Details:  The workshop will examine three pieces of art, each in someway tangentially related to one another.  Each art work will be discussed for the length of one 45 minute session.  Slides will be used to show the artwork.  Within the slides will be other ideas, artworks, and images that I have curated to frame the 3 pieces being discussed.

-Limited to 10 Participants

-Requirements:  Come with respectful openness and a willingness to engage others in conversation.  No prior expertise are necessary.

Link to SURVEY form for feedbackAbove: Slide 1 of my workshop.

Above: Sampling of images, ideas, and technologies which informed the intellectual climate in which ‘A Bar at the Folies-Bergere’ was created.

Overview:  The workshop started off a bit shaky.  I had presented a series of individual slides and a final slide showing the curated images all together.  At first, it definitely felt like a lecture and not so much like a symposium.  I went through each slide and was asked by the group to explain each image.  Even by the time that I got to my last slide of the collected images, I felt like I was doing most of the discussion alone that I was hoping would be done by the group.  The ideas which I hoped would come through with the collection altogether, I realized after would have maybe been easier to grasp or form if I would have done more easily digestible pairings of ideas.  In short, I should have taken a slower walk-through the images and the ideas that they invoked. I should have started with couplings being discussed first and the group of images and it’s general idea being discussed last.

The other thing I realized is how hard it is to get a group of individuals talking openly about a foreign subject.  After about 20 mins or so, the symposium quickly diverted away from the slides and moved on to topics of personal interest and relevance.  It was then that the discussion became interesting and disagreements started to happen.  The conversation started with Art, moved on to Art versus Design (and Craft), then to Technology as a catalyst for intellectual changes in perspective, and finally to what is art and what constitutes art.  In the end we all agreed that it was intent that constituted something to be art.  The conversation became more interesting at moments of self reflection and our approach to person work, what we make, and how we define ourselves.

In truth, the images were purely there to prompt discussion.  I was more than satisfied that conversation was taking place even though we weren’t talking about the slides specifically.  Often the slides functioned as supportive images for making claims about individual ideas.  I found that to be really successful.  I also think that people really learned from each others perspectives.  I don’t think we always agreed, but we definitely expanded our approaches to ideas for future discussions.

Critique/Advice:  The exercise was hugely informative in how  hard it is to teach and how to think on your feet.  My ideas didn’t come through in discussion liked I hoped.  I should take my group through the ideas in the slides slower in the future.Above: Symposium in process…Above: Sampling of images, ideas, and technologies which informed the intellectual climate of the ‘Nude Descending a Staircase’ by Marcel Duchamp.

 

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Newtown 2050

March 17, 2017
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Collaborators: Marina Zurkow, Nick Hubbard, Rebecca Lieberman

Newtown 2050 is a project originally started by Marina Zurkow, Nick Hubbard, and Rebecca Lieberman.  The project started off as a post-naturalist project examining Newtown Creek, a U.S. Super Fund site which has been heavily polluted over the last century.  The original project was a walking sound tour concentrated on the Newtown Creek Nature Walk, a park located in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.  The sound tour was intended to be a artistic platform to make the creek and its history more accessible and engaging.  This project and it’s potential engagement has expanded.

I was brought on to make a VR piece examining a possible future Newtown Creek in the year 2050.  We asked ourselves, what kind of bottom-up interventions could reclaim the creek from industry and what types of ad hoc participation could clean up the creek and mitigate further damage?   I will make a physical printed map that will allow us to survey with QGIS.  We will take this survey map around the creek via bike to talk to workers and locals from the area and “map” unquantifiable information and collect data from marginalized communities.  The second part of the map, is to make an interactive 3D map of the space that shares the same data from the physical survey map.  I plan on using either Tangram by Mapzen or Unity with Mapbox.

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Mapping

March 6, 2017
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Assignment 4: Practice with Mapbox and QGIS.  Below is a map of North Carolina, the state that I grew up.  The above maps are two screenshots of the swimming pool landscape in New York City.  The left is Greenpoint.  The right is an area in Staten Island.  I wanted to see if swimming pool data would correlate to wealthier areas in New York.  The proxy data illustrates more about cultural values than socioeconomic demographics.Assignment 3:  Moves App Data… I didn’t have an interesting enough life so I took a trip to fire island with help from geojson.io.Assignment 2:  Newtown Creek Zone marked with leafletjs functions.  Newtown Creek is a SuperFund site located very close to my home.  It is a toxic waste area which the government is working to clean up.Assignment 1: The tip of Greenpoint, coordinate points [0.7294091,-73.9530581,16z].

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[Final] Conversations in Punk: Art within Intellectual Climate Change

March 5, 2017
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Above: Possible webpage for course information on museum website

Theme:  The course is intended to examine the intellectual climate around a specific art piece.  The art piece will be examined intensively in reference to other artworks, music, literature, culture, politics, and sciences of and around the period in which it was made in order to frame the choices the artists made with the execution of their piece.  Courses will also examine the piece’s importance within the larger conversations in art.

Objective: The course is meant to be an introductory level course that will teach participants to look at art and become more visually literate for certain themes and ideas not completely transparent for all audiences.

Who: Every month the course will be taught and curated by a guest artist or art historian.  This expert will be encouraged to engage topics of interest to them and to stimulate conversation in areas of interest to the workshop participants.  Experts will be required to examine work in relation to topics of music, literature, culture, politics, and sciences; not art alone.

Duration: Each topic would last one month.  The consecutive month’s topic would be roughly based on the art, artists, or ideas presented in the previous course topic.  The courses would be tangentially related and participants would be encouraged to return for next workshop topic in the following month.  The topics would not be focused on a timeline.

Setting: The workshop would take place within a private gallery space.  The gallery would be curated and organized by the guest expert.  The expert will be allowed to select any number of pieces from the museum collection (not currently exhibit) to be viewed and discussed with the workshop participants.  The expert will also be encouraged to bring in auxiliary material which can be presented as they choose within the gallery space.  Within the gallery would be a large oval table to sit at most 15 people.  This is where the symposium style discussions would take place led by the instructor.

Feasible Alternative:  Since the above is my dream workshop, I propose an alternative to my workshop.  Instead, I propose a workshop broken into 3 sessions.   The sessions would be similar to my MoMA museum workshop I did last week.  Each session would focus on one art piece.  I would bring a series of slides with art, music, literature, culture, politics, and sciences to examine the piece being discussed.  I will chose 3 pieces of work which are tangentially related to each other in order to keep cohesion between sessions.

Below: Possible survey questions to improve workshop

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Mycelium 3D Printer

March 1, 2017
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Instructor: Stefani Bardin || Collaborators: Kadallah Burrowes

We propose to make a gantry-based additive manufacturing robot (ie. 3D printer) which extrudes fibrous nutrient material that has been inoculated with mushroom spores. We propose a digital fabrication technique that is more sustainable and environmentally responsible.  We hope to implement the mycelium 3D printer in fabricating a bee hive out of mushroom material.  The digital fabrication process will allow us to test and study the type of form and architecture which can be design to deter mite infestations in bee hives.  We are looking to the research of Paul Stamets who has been experimenting with certain types of mushrooms and their attributes to prevent mite infestations in hives.  We hope to see if architectural form and materiality can be used to in tandem to prevent mite infestation and colony collapse of bee hives.

Rough project schedule

Paul Stamets

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Gym Bunny

March 1, 2017
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Within gay culture the gym has become a sacred site.  It has become a holy ground of immense tension for men and their potential partners. The gym is the place where one goes to build themselves into a commodity to be devoured.  Men go to the gym to prepare for courtship; however, more importantly, it is also the site of many courtship rituals.  Within the intoxicating air filled with testosterone, sweat, and body odor, glances are exchanged, compliments are given, and flirtation is provoked.  It is the place of vulnerability, empowerment, potential, and release for those whom for most of their lives have been unable to explore their sexuality.  To see and to bee seen: the atmosphere of the gym is not unlike the atmosphere of a bar or club.
A dumbbell atop of a fur pedestal.  The dumbbell itself, slowly inching along the pedestal surface moving from one end to the other to complete its necessary set of reps.   It grunts and releases its moans of exhaustion with every effort.  What is the dumbbell alone?  What is the dumbbell now as it is prostrated across fur?  What type of conversation is created between these two subjects?  The dumbbell has now become a sexual object and we are the voyeur participating in its seduction.

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[Museum Exercise] Conversations in Punk: Art within Intellectual Climate Change

February 27, 2017
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Partner: Franklin Zhu

Franklin and I decided to go to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) this week.  The two of us each researched pieces that would allow us to do our workshops.  His workshop on technology in art and mine on art in context.  Franklin chose to build his work shop around Teiji Furuhashi’s Lovers and I chose Dieter Roth’s KarnickelKottelKarnickel (Bunny-dropping-bunny, published in 1972).  After viewing Teiji Furuhashi’s piece, we had a conversation about the work, the technology used, and why the specific technology (rotating projectors) was appropriately used.  Franklin had a really interesting take on technology in art.  For thesis, Franklin is making a dragon with technology which speaks a lot to the idea of technology and is mysticism.  As our discussion continued, we realized that the column of rotating projectors which Furuhashi used to create his phantasms is the equivalent to Franklin’s magic dragon.  There is a magic to technology in art and that magic occurs when technology is appropriately used and consequently no longer matters.  Technology becomes magic when only the poetry of the piece is important.

Above: Photos from the Teiji Furuhashi Lovers exhibit MoMA 2017

For my workshop, I chose Dieter Roth’s KarnickelKottelKarnickel which was part of the exhibit, ‘From the Collection: 1960-1969’.  I had randomly chosen the piece that I liked from the MoMA website that was indicated as currently being exhibited.  Little did I know, ‘From the Collection: 1960-1969’ was actually doing something really similar to what I was trying to achieve with my workshop.  The exhibit had work from art, architecture, and design spanning the whole decade and a bit after into the mid-70s, all displayed within the same gallery right next to one another.  The variety of work exhibited together created conversation between pieces and seemed to allude to the zeitgeist of the period.Above: Screenshot from the MoMA website exhibition page

For my workshop I brought a series of slides on my iPhone that I felt contextualized Roth’s process and approach to the creation of KarnickelKottelKarnickel.  Within the slides I included work Roth created before and after 1972, work from paralleling art movements of the time, historical events around 1972, and art that has been created since 1972 that seems to be in conversation with Roth’s work.  My workshop contextualized in a different way than the MoMA exhibit.  The exhibit indirectly contextualized through a general sampling of works from that period, whereas my presentation tried to contextualize a singular art piece through the work, thinkers, and events of the time.

Above: Slides from my iPhone slide show

After seeing and presenting within the exhibit, I wonder what parts of my workshop and what parts of the exhibition were done well and what could have been done better.  I really like the idea of zeitgeist in relation to the “intellectual climate” that I proposed for my workshop.  To me they run parallel to each other.   I think that my workshop would have benefited by having other forms of intellectual work: music, design, architecture, poetry.  Including other areas of creativity was something that I had spoken about in my original proposal, but had left out due limited research and an inaccessibility to experts in these respective fields.

Above: Photo collage of display cabinet with art, objects, posters, and garments from the late 1960s.  Dieter Roth’s KarnickelKottelKarnickel is displayed on a white shelf with other pieces.  

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Soft Robotics Material

February 23, 2017
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MaterialConnexion had a large collection of soft conductive filament/ink which could be embedded or affixed to soft surfaces.  I am interested in how these soft circuits could be used with silicone casting methods to create silicone objects with new material properties and performance.  Embedding the conductive circuits within the silicone could create more structure and less elasticity in areas of the silicone membrane diversifying the silicone functionality.  I wonder if it is possible to also embed actuators  or other rigid components to build in mechanisms otherwise usually adhered to the exterior surfaces.  I’m not sure if I will will use these materials for my future projects.

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